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Inventory Site Record

Eton Avenue (Camden)

Brief Description

This area was part of farmland held by Eton College since the C15th, which remained rural until the C19th when it was developed in three phases from the 1840s onwards. Much of the area around Eton Avenue was developed by speculative builder William Willett between 1886-1894, largely the work of architects Harry Measures and Amos Faulkner and inspired by Arts and Crafts style. At the junction of Eton Avenue and Adamson Road is a small triangular green with two trees, which has been maintained as public open space by Hampstead Borough Council since the late C19th or early C20th.

Practical Information
Site location:
Eton Avenue, Swiss Cottage
Postcode:
NW3
What 3 Words:
pans.rider.jungle
Type of site:
Public Open Land
Borough:
Camden
Open to public?
Yes
Opening times:
unrestricted
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Events:
Public transport:
Tube: Swiss Cottage (Jubilee).
Research updated:
01/08/2002
Last minor changes:
19/07/2023

Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.camden.gov.uk

Full Site Description

This area was part of 243 acres of land held by the Provost and College of Eton since 1449, which was mainly farmland until it was developed in three phases from the 1840s onwards. The estate was once the Manor of Chalcots, from which Chalk Farm takes its name, and until Henry VIII granted it to Eton College it had been owned by St James's Leper Hospital at Westminster. The development of the area was encouraged by John Nash's Regent's Park development on the Crown Estate, which led to builders and landowners assessing the area north of the park as to its suitability for fashionable housing. The Eton College Estate was surveyed in 1824 and an Act of Parliament granted the college the authority to issue building leases, although this did not begin in earnest until the 1830s. The area north of Adelaide Road was developed from the 1860s and Eton Avenue was part of area developed by speculative builder William Willett between 1886 and 1894, largely the work of architects Harry Measures and Amos Faulkner and inspired by Arts and Crafts style. At the junction of Eton Avenue and Adamson Road is a small triangular green with two trees, which has been maintained as public open space by Hampstead Borough Council since the early C20th. A number of the houses designed by Faulkner in Eton Avenue are listed. Adamson Road is said to have been named after a contractor working for the Eton Estate.

Sources consulted:

Report of Royal Commission on London Squares, 1928; 'The Streets of Belsize Park' (Camden History Society, 1991)

Further Information (Planning and Conservation)
Grid ref:
TQ268844 (526766,184396)
Size in hectares:
0.0094
Site ownership:
LB Camden
Site management:
Parks & Open Spaces
Date(s):
late C19th
Designer(s):
Listed structures:
None
On National Heritage List for England (NHLE), Parks & Gardens:

No
Registered common or village green on Commons Registration Act 1965:

No
Protected under London Squares Preservation Act 1931:

Yes

Local Authority Data

The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.

On Local List:
No
In Conservation Area:
Yes
Conservation Area name:
Belsize Park
Tree Preservation Order:
No
Nature Conservation Area:
No
Green Belt:
No
Metropolitan Open Land:
No
Special Policy Area:
Other LA designation:
Public Open Space (Small Local). London Squares Preservation Act 1931.
Photos

Eton Avenue

Eton Avenue, August 2002. Photo: S Williams

Click a photo to enlarge.

Please note the Inventory and its content are provided for your general information only and are subject to change. It is your responsibility to check the accuracy.