fbpx

Inventory Site Record

Pitshanger Park (Ealing)

Brief Description

The area was once part of the estate of Pitshanger Manor Farm. The old manor house, usually referred to as Pitshanger Farmhouse, had stood near the centre of the modern Meadvale Road, but was demolished in 1908. Ealing Town Council acquired land for the public park in January and April 1905, adding further land in 1913. By 1914 this was laid out with a bowling green, tennis courts, cricket pitches, a perimeter path planted with horse chestnuts, and other paths leading to the entrance off Pitshanger Lane. In 1976 Pitshanger Park became part of the Brent River Park following proposals by the Brent River and Canal Society, which was established in 1973 to set up a linear park and improve the Brent Valley river corridor.

Practical Information
Site location:
Meadvale Road/Scotch Common/Argyle Road, Ealing
Postcode:
W5/W13
What 3 Words:
gained.sector.wipe
Type of site:
Public Park
Borough:
Ealing
Open to public?
Yes
Opening times:
unrestricted
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Playground, play centre, bowling green, tennis courts, football pitches, car park, toilets
Events:
Various events
Public transport:
Tube: Perivale (Central) then bus. Bus: 95, 297, E2, E7, E9.
Research updated:
01/11/2010
Last minor changes:
19/07/2023

Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.ealing.gov.uk/services/environment/parks_and_open_spaces

Full Site Description

The name Pitshanger comes from Anglo-Saxon meaning 'wooded slope frequented by kites'. The area was part of the estate of Pitshanger Manor Farm, which was owned in 1690 by Margaret Edwards, later inherited by her descendent Thomas Edwards whose book 'Canons of Criticism' was well-known. After his death in 1757 the estate was sold to King Gould whose son passed it to Thomas Gurnell, who by that time had built Pitshanger Manor in Ealing, the grounds of which are now Walpole Park (q.v.) It then passed to Mrs Peyton, widow of Admiral Peyton but whose first husband was Jonathan Gurnell, and then to the Meacock family who had the estate until 1856. The old manor house, usually referred to as Pitshanger Farmhouse, had stood near the centre of the modern Meadvale Road, a plain house of brick and tile, but it was demolished in 1908.

Ealing Town Council had acquired land for a public park in January and April 1905, which was bounded in the north by the River Brent, abutting the Recreation Ground of Brentham Garden Suburb (q.v.) to the east, and as far as Bellevue Road to the west. By 1914 this was laid out with a bowling green, tennis courts, cricket pitches, a perimeter path planted with horse chestnuts, and other paths leading to the entrance off Pitshanger Lane. In 1913 the Council had purchased a further 26.5 acres by auction for £7,500, saving it from housing development. This extended the park to the west to the current boundary on Argyle Road, then called Greenford Road. In 1914 they were proposing to purchase land south of Scotch Common, which later became Cleveland Park (q.v.), the creation of which was delayed by the outbreak of World War I.

The western area of Pitshanger Park has simpler planting and is principally low-key playing fields, with an old footpath running to Perivale directly north of the junction with Argyle Road and Scotch Common, where an avenue of horse chestnuts was planted. There is a notable group of mature oaks on a bank at the southern boundary near Scotch Common opposite Kent Avenue. Scrub oak and thorn are found along the River Brent along the east and north park boundary. North of the river is Ealing Golf Course, which shows little sign of earlier planting, now dominated by "golf course trees" - birch, flowering cherry and willow.

In 1976 Pitshanger Park became part of the Brent River Park following proposals by the Brent River and Canal Society, which was established in 1973 to set up a linear park and improve the Brent Valley river corridor. Brent River Park covers 400 hectares along its 7km length, and includes formal parks such as Brent Lodge Park, Churchfields Recreation Ground and Elthorne Park (q.q.v.) and open space, golf courses, sports grounds, allotments and privately owned land. Brent River Park received £400,000 in 2009 under the Mayor of London's Priority Parks scheme, which was matched by £487,000 from Ealing Council. Improvement projects are underway in the various parks and open spaces that come under Brent River Park, including new fitness equipment in Pitshanger Park. Pitshanger Community Association was established to improve the park and its surroundings, and has run major community events here to bring attention to the park.

Sources consulted:

Victoria County History 127; Ben Weinreb & Christopher Hibbert, 'The London Encyclopaedia' (Macmillan, revised ed. 1993); Charles Jones, 'Ealing from Village to Corporate Life, or 40 Years of Municipal Life', nd, (c1903?); Middlesex County Times 24/5/1913, 31/5/1913; 2/5/1914.

Further Information (Planning and Conservation)
Grid ref:
TQ165820 (516709,182308)
Size in hectares:
21.25
Site ownership:
LB Ealing
Site management:
Leisure & Park Service; East Ranger Team. Pitshanger Community Association
Date(s):
1905, 1913
Designer(s):
?Charles Jones, Borough Surveyor
Listed structures:
None
On National Heritage List for England (NHLE), Parks & Gardens:

No
Registered common or village green on Commons Registration Act 1965:

No
Protected under London Squares Preservation Act 1931:

No

Local Authority Data

The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.

On Local List:
No
In Conservation Area:
No
Tree Preservation Order:
Not known
Nature Conservation Area:
No
Green Belt:
No
Metropolitan Open Land:
Yes
Special Policy Area:
Yes - Area of Archaeological Interest
Other LA designation:
Within Brent River Park Boundary

Please note the Inventory and its content are provided for your general information only and are subject to change. It is your responsibility to check the accuracy.