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Inventory Site Record

St John's Churchyard North Extension (Camden)

Brief Description

The land for St John's Churchyard North Extension was acquired in 1811 to provide additional burial space for the parish church of St John-at-Hampstead directly to the south. The Additional Burial Ground, consecrated by the Bishop of London in 1812, was laid out in a grid marked A-Q west to east and 1-110 south to north. There are a few chest tombs, and several graves have the form of miniature gardens. Among those buried here are Sir Walter Besant, George du Maurier, Hugh Gaitskill and George Gilbert Scott Jnr. There are two fine Cedars of Lebanon and other mature trees including oak, yew, copper beech.

Practical Information
Previous / Other name:
Additional Burial Ground of Hampstead Parish Church
Site location:
Church Row
Postcode:
NW3
What 3 Words:
slang.prom.item
Type of site:
Churchyard
Borough:
Camden
Open to public?
Yes
Opening times:
locked at night, otherwise unrestricted
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Events:
Public transport:
Tube: Hampstead. Bus: 46, 268.
Research updated:
01/08/2002
Last minor changes:
19/07/2023

Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.hampsteadparishchurch.org

Full Site Description

The site was acquired in 1811 to provide an extension to the churchyard of St John-at-Hampstead (q.v.) directly to the south, and was consecrated by the Bishop of London in 1812. Known as the Additional Burial Ground, it was laid out in a grid marked A-Q west to east and 1-110 south to north. In the north-east corner the Columbarium or cloister was added by the 1930s, with a memorial garden nearby. The burial ground has two fine Cedars of Lebanon and other mature trees including oak, yew, copper beech, and contains monuments in rows, and on Church Row has good C19th gate piers and railings of c.1811. The site is bounded to the east by a hedge consisting of hawthorn, elder, holly and wild roses.

Among those buried here is Sir Walter Besant (d.1901), novelist, antiquarian, social reformer who lived in Hampstead. His socially-conscious novels prompted the establishment of the People's Palace in Mile End; he also wrote a 10 volume survey of London. The headstone has a quotation from Leigh Hunt, 'Write as one who loves his fellow-men'. Also Arthur Llewelyn Davies (d.1907), barrister, who married the 2nd daughter of George du Maurier, 'Punch' cartoonist and novelist who lived in Hampstead 1870-1895. Davies and his wife's five sons were the inspiration for 'Peter Pan' (1903), having met JM Barrie in Hyde Park in 1897; Barrie adopted the boys after their parents' death, who both died young. George du Maurier and his wife Emma are also buried in the churchyard, their wooden memorial, c1896, having a quotation from 'Trilby', his most successful novel, "A little trust that, when we die, we reap our sowing - and so, goodbye!". George Gilbert Scott Jnr (1839-97), son of Sir George Gilbert Scott (1811-78) and father of renowned architect Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, as well as a significant architect in his own right. Eve Hammersley (d.1902) was the young daughter of an artistic/literary family who lived at Admiral's House; her tomb of 1903 has sculptured bronze figures on a podium, including an over lifesize winged angel cradling and kissing a young sleeping girl by Harry Furse. Temple Moore, who enlarged St John-at-Hampstead Church is also buried here, his headstone tomb, c1920 designed by his son-in-law, the architect Leslie T Moore. There are several graves in the form of miniature gardens, such as that of Amy Mount (d.1936), which has a bench, paths and a sundial.

Sources consulted:

Michael Waite, Daniel Keech, Meg Game, 'Nature Conservation in Camden', Ecology Handbook 24 (London Ecology Unit), 1993; Christopher Wade, 'Buried in Hampstead' (Camden History Society, 1986); John Richardson, 'A History of Camden. Hampstead, Holborn, St Pancras' (Historical Publications Ltd, 1999)

Further Information (Planning and Conservation)
Grid ref:
TQ262856 (526243,185699)
Size in hectares:
(see St John-at-Hampstead)
Site ownership:
Diocese of London
Site management:
St John's Parish Church Management Committee
Date(s):
1812
Designer(s):
Listed structures:
LBII: St John's Churchyard Extension gates and railings; Tombs of: Sir Walter Besant and family, A L Davies and family, George Gilbert Scott Jnr, Eve Hammersley, Temple Moore, George du Maurier & his wife.
On National Heritage List for England (NHLE), Parks & Gardens:

No
Registered common or village green on Commons Registration Act 1965:

No
Protected under London Squares Preservation Act 1931:

No

Local Authority Data

The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.

On Local List:
Yes
In Conservation Area:
Yes
Conservation Area name:
Hampstead Village
Tree Preservation Order:
Not known
Nature Conservation Area:
Yes - Borough Importance II
Green Belt:
No
Metropolitan Open Land:
No
Special Policy Area:
Yes - Area of Special Character: Hampstead & Highgate Ridge
Other LA designation:
None
Photos

St John's Churchyard North Extension

St John's Churchyard North Extension, Columbarium, August 2002. Photo: S Williams

St John's Churchyard North Extension, St John-at-Hampstead Church behind, August 2002. Photo: S Williams
2002

Click a photo to enlarge.

Please note the Inventory and its content are provided for your general information only and are subject to change. It is your responsibility to check the accuracy.