Inventory Site Record

St Anne and St Agnes

St Anne and St Agnes (City of London)

Brief Description

In the early C12th and C13th the church here is recorded variously as St Agnes and St Anne, and by 1460 both saints are referred to. By 1269 there are records of a churchyard. Largely destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666 a new church was built in 1677-1687 by Wren, later damaged by bombing in WWII it was restored in 1963-68 in keeping with Wren's designs. The churchyard was extended on the south and east side as a result of bomb damage and a garden was created in the early 1970s with an area of lawn with some tombstones near the church, low walls surrounding it and a good variety of trees. When Noble Street was widened the churchyard garden was united with public gardens to the north to create one public open space with seating and shrubberies.

Practical Information
Site location:
Noble Street/Gresham Street
Postcode:
EC1A 4ER
Type of site:
Public Gardens
Borough:
City of London
Open to public?
Yes
Opening times:
unrestricted
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Events:
Public transport:
Tube: St Paul's (Central)

The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/05/2010
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news. www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/openspaces

Full Site Description

In the early C12th the church was known as St Agnes when it was granted to the Dean and Chapter of St Martin's-le-Grand. In a will of 1275 it is referred to as St Anne de Aldredesgate; it was also known as St Ann-in-the-Willows and by 1460 both saints are referred to jointly. By 1269 a churchyard is recorded here. The church suffered damage in a fire in 1548 and was largely destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666 after which the parish of St Anne and St Agnes was amalgamated by an Act of Parliament of 1670 with that of St John Zachary which was not rebuilt, now the site of Goldsmiths' Company Zachary Garden (q.v.). The new church of St Anne and St Agnes was built between 1677-1687 but largely completed by 1681, designed by Wren, possibly with some work by Hooke, and it incorporated 2 lower stages of the medieval tower. An engraving of c.1839 shows the church with trees beside it. It was damaged by bombing in World War II and restored in 1963-68 in keeping with Wren's designs, and was re-hallowed on 23 April 1966.

The churchyard was extended on the south and east side as a result of bomb damage and a garden created in the early 1970s with an area of lawn with some tombstones near the church, low walls surrounding it and a good variety of trees including maple, lime, catalpa, false acacia, plane, ash, rowan and cherry. When Noble Street was widened the churchyard garden was united with public gardens to the north to create one public open space with seating and shrubberies. There was until 1990s a 'wild garden' on the north side of the churchyard but this has been lost. The church is now used by the Lutherans.

Sources consulted:

B Plummer and D Shewan, 'City Gardens', London, 1992; F E Cleary, 'The Flowering City', The City Press, 1969; George Godwin & John Britton 'The Churches of London: A history and description of the Ecclesiastical Edifices of the Metropolis, Volume II', London, 1839; Simon Bradley & Nikolaus Pevsner, 'The Buildings of England, London 1: The City of London', 1997 (1999 ed.); Philip Norman, 'The London City Churches, Their Use, Their Preservation and Their Extended Use', The London Society, (1920s); London Diocesan Advisory Committee for the Care of Churches data.

Further Information (Planning and Conservation)
Grid ref:
TQ321814 (532190,181431)
Size in hectares:
0.1323
Site ownership:
Diocese of London (churchyard)/City of London Corporation (extension north on Noble Street)
Site management:
City of London Corporation Open Spaces Dept
Date(s):
C13, 1677-87; 1966; 1970s
Designer(s):
Listed structures:
LBI: St Anne and St Agnes Church
On National Heritage List for England (NHLE), Parks & Gardens:

No
Registered common or village green on Commons Registration Act 1965:

No
Protected under London Squares Preservation Act 1931:

No

Local Authority Data

The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.

On Local List:
No
In Conservation Area:
No
Tree Preservation Order:
No
Nature Conservation Area:
No
Green Belt:
No
Metropolitan Open Land:
No
Special Policy Area:
No
Other LA designation:
Strategic View - Consultation Area
Photos

St Anne and St Agnes

St Anne and St Agnes, May 2010. Photo: S Williams

Click photo to enlarge.

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