Inventory Site Record

Elm Park Gardens

Elm Park Gardens (Kensington & Chelsea)

Summary

This private communal garden was provided for residents of Elm Park Gardens, which were laid out in 1875 by George Godwin. The site was formerly part of the grounds of Chelsea Park and a single mulberry tree survived in the centre of the garden until 1906. The garden consists of a number of strips of planting between old and new buildings, with lawn, mature trees and paved areas.

Basic Details
Previous / Other name:
Site of Chelsea Park
Site location:
Elm Park Gardens
Postcode:
SW10
Type of site:
Garden Square
Date(s):
1875
Designer(s):
Listed structures:
None
Borough:
Kensington & Chelsea
Site ownership:
private
Site management:
Open to public?
No
Opening times:
private, for keyholders only
Special conditions:
Facilities:
Events:
Public transport:
Tube: South Kensington (District, Circle, Piccadilly)

The information shown above was correct at the time of the last update 01/10/2007
Please check with the site owner or manager for latest news.

Further Information
Grid ref:
TQ266780 (526718,178120)
Size in hectares:
1.0591
On EH National Register :
No
EH grade:
None
Registered common or village green on Commons Registration Act 1965:
No
Protected under London Squares Preservation Act 1931:
Yes

Local Authority Data

The information below is taken from the relevant Local Authority's planning legislation, which was correct at the time of research but may have been amended in the interim. Please check with the Local Authority for latest planning information.

On Local List:
No
In Conservation Area:
No
Tree Preservation Order:
Not known
Nature Conservation Area:
No
Green Belt:
No
Metropolitan Open Land:
No
Special Policy Area:
No
Other LA designation:
None
Fuller information

By early C17th, grand houses, among them early properties of Henry VIII and Sir Thomas More (Beaufort House), began to be established around the old village of Chelsea. In subsequent decades more building took place both along the river as well as further inland particularly up Church Lane, now Old Church Street, which developed northwards to the Queen's Elm. This is where Queen Elizabeth I is supposed to have sheltered from the rain with Lord Burghley; the 'Queen's Tree' was recorded as early as 1586 and an arbour was built around it. In the early C16th an area between Duke's Walk and Lovers' Walk called 'Sand Hill' was part of Sir Thomas More's estate. In 1664 it was known as Lord Wharton's Park after its then owner; after Wharton sold his property in 1714 it became known as Chelsea Park. By c.1718 it had been purchased for a mulberry garden with the purpose of manufacturing raw silk but the venture failed, and Chelsea Park was gradually built over for housing.

Sources consulted:

Beresford Chancellor; Bridget Cherry and Nikolaus Pevsner, 'The Buildings of England London 3: North West' (Penguin, 1999 ed) p586; RBKC Chelsea Square / Carlyle Conservation Area Policy Statement; Report of the Royal Commission on London Squares, 1928

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